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Whittemore-Durgin Stained Glass Supplies
825 Market St., Rockland MA 02370
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How to Do Stained Glass - Glass Cutting 102: Breaking Out the Score


Scoring Glass << Previous          Next >> Grozing and Grinding Glass

Breaking out the Score
This is the term used to describe the act of snapping the glass along the score line to complete the fracture. It can be accomplished in several different ways, depending upon the intricacy of the line. The simplest way, provided there are ample areas on either side of the score for you to hold the glass, is to pick the glass up and snap it as you would a soda cracker. Always grasp the glass at the edge nearest you.
Breaking pliers
Breaking pliers
or breaker/grozier pliers are also useful in breaking off larger strips resulting from straight cuts.
Narrow strips of glass
Narrow strips of glass
may be removed successfully using one of the notches on the head of the glass cutter, being sure to break the strip downward.
Intricate cuts
Intricate cuts
consisting of sharp curves can be made successfully by treating them as a series of smooth curves, and breaking them out individually. It is next to impossible to cut the glass for an entire curved pattern in one cut. Make cuts along segments of the line and then lead the cut out to the edge of the glass. Just as in cutting ice with an ice pick, you cannot coax the fracture in the glass to follow a curved score. You must convert your sharply curved lines into a series of gentle curves. You may have to make as many as ten or twelve separate scores and breaks to complete some sharply curved pattern lines.


Scoring Glass << Previous          Next >> Grozing and Grinding Glass